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John Kasich, Mark Cuban share disdain for Trump

(April 2, 2018) — Billionaire Mark Cuban and Ohio Gov. John Kasich spoke about topics ranging from business to Donald Trump during an event Monday at Ohio State University.

Kasich, who never endorsed Trump, said he is continually disappointed in Trump’s presidency and emphasized the importance of “bottom-up” community action to win back disgruntled voters who supported Trump. Kasich said a sense of hopelessness led voters to elect Trump, and restoring their hope is crucial to winning them back.

“For the people who are disgruntled, we have to rescue them,” he said.

Kasich likened the election of Trump to a patient seeking treatment from a “witch doctor” after conventional treatment fails.

Cuban, who Trump previously attacked in a tweet as “not smart enough to run for president,” said he would consider a presidential campaign, perhaps as an independent, if the Republicans retain their majority in the U.S. House and Senate after the midterm elections this year.

Speaking separately from Kasich, the Dallas Mavericks owner added that while he thought Trump may be correct on some issues, it didn’t necessarily mean that Trump knew what he was doing.

“I’ve known him a long time,” Cuban said. “He hasn’t changed at all.”

The event, hosted by Axios, a news and information website, and JPMorgan Chase & Co, focused on both current news, workforce advice and the impact automation could have on jobs.

Artificial intelligence and advancing technologies could soon eliminate many jobs, Cuban said.

“For a lot of jobs that can be automated, they will be automated,” he said.

While AI technologies and automation could lead to short term disruption in the job market, but would ultimately open up opportunities for more “socially conscious” jobs, Cuban said. He encouraged students, regardless of their major, to learn about artificial intelligence.

“If I can do it, you can do it,” Cuban said.

Kasich spoke about the possibility of automation and the benefits of tech industries for Ohio.

“I want us to do everything, I want us to be everything,” Kasich said. “If you don’t take risks, you can’t be successful.”

Kasich has been a proponent of “smart” industries in the past; in January, he signed an order to create DriveOhio, an initiative initiative to capture research and development of the high-tech future of transportation.